This week saw Le Tour launch from the Pyrénées into the Alps and what an interesting, and one-of-a-kind type of stage finish we had yesterday atop Mont Ventoux. Our week in tech was tame in comparison to what we saw on the re-arranged finish at Le Chalet Reynard, but there was still some exciting news – a new ultra-light crankset from Easton, a tubeless seating pump from Lezyne, Marin’s Gestalt gravel bike from the pages of peloton 51, our weekly paddock of goods as well as a video analyzing André ‘The Gorilla’ Greipel’s TdF Noah SL. 

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RELATED: Peloton Week in Tech: July 2nd – 8th

A Powerful Pump from Lezyne

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Micki Kozuschek and a small group founded the San Luis Obispo, California based company in 2007 with one goal in mind – to create exquisitely designed, yet extremely compact and functional bicycle components. A german native, Kozuschek started one of the leading OEM component manufactures Truvativ in the 90s. After selling the business to SRAM in 2004 and taking a break to refocus his energy, he helped bring Lezyne to market with engineered design as their motto. Clean, well-built and utilitarian made tools for the everyday rider, pro shop mechanic or anyone in between.

On Test: Digital Pressure Over Drive Pump From Lezyne

Lightweight Cranks Delivered by Easton

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Greatly influenced by Race Face, a company steeped in the history of designing and building mountain bike cranks, Easton introduces the cinch crank system in the ultra-light EC90 SL Crankset. By sharing innovative technologies and working closely with its sister company Race Face, Easton brings to the table a product that aims to change the game for gearing adjustments from the everyday, backwoods gravel rider to the elite cyclocross racer facing various course conditions.

Watch and read more: Easton Launches New EC90 SL Crankset

Marin’s Gestalt Finding Roads Less Traveled

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Gestalt therapy is an attempt to find order in a chaotic world, to organize ourselves into a being that becomes more than the sum of its parts. Marin has taken this rather esoteric term and applied it to its latest “beyond road” platforms designed for adventure—and it fits. The most expensive bike in the line is only $2,254, and from the alloy frame to the SRAM Rival 1x, cost has been carefully controlled by these parts; yet the sum—the Marin Gestalt 3—is a lust-inducing machine that can help you find order in the chaos of the backcountry.

Read from the pages of peloton: Adventure Therapy – Marin’s Gestalt

From the Peloton Paddock

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Week two of the Tour went off with a bang as a large breakaway whittled down to a star-studded selection at the line. At the #PelotonServiceCourse, week two of July started out cutting footage from our French adventure – look for more videos to be delivered in the coming weeks. In the meantime, enjoy a custom painted Specialized track bike, some food for thought from Koroyd regarding your current helmet’s protection level  and a new gravel grinder coming from Fuji Bikes.

Full Paddock Here: Custom Specialized Allez, Koroyd & Fuji

The Gorilla’s TdF Steed

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The aerodynamic Ridley Noah SL is the choice of big German sprinter, André Greipel, for the 2016 Tour de France. We traveled to Normandy for the first week of Le Tour where we spent a few days with Team Lotto Soudal to learn about the bikes André Greipel will be racing. First up, his Ridley Noah SL. As the big German aims to add to his 10 Tour stage wins, this is the bike he rides for the sprint stages. The frame weighs less than 1,000 grams, is stiff enough to handle his huge watts and benefits from a host of aero features.

Watch: André Greipel’s Ridley Noah SL Tour Race Bike

Follow all the news from the #PelotonServiceCourse online @pelotonmagazine and on Instagram/Twitter for continued updates on new products in the pipeline and technology spotted at the races.