Kuat Sherpa 2.0 It's not Kuat's most expensive rack, but it's quickly becoming our favorite

Though occupying the second tier in the Kuat hitch rack lineup, the Sherpa 2.0 just might be our new favorite rack. This sleek aluminum rack takes the ease of use of the NV 2.0 and strips away some of the features that, while nice, are ancillary to getting a couple of road bikes from point A to point B. There’s no integrated repair stand or option to expand to four bikes, and only a 40 lbs./bike weight limit instead of 60 lbs. But what you are left with is a rack that gets two bikes wherever they need to go with no fuss—and about an extra $200 in the bank.

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Kuat’s racks are consistently some of the best looking available, and the Sherpa 2.0 is no exception. This low-profile rack features smooth welds and a gloss metallic powder coat finish— available in three colors—that elevates the look and feel of this rack to a step above the competition. We’re especially fans of the pearl metallic with silver anodize option. And when the rack is not in use, the tire cradles can fold up for an even sleeker package.

The Sherpa isn’t just good looking; it works impeccably too. A foot pedal allows you to smoothly fold the rack into position when your hands are busy holding a bike or a pre-ride snack. Once the rack is in place, each bike is held securely by an arm that ratchets down over the front wheel, and a sturdy molded plastic strap that wraps around the rear wheel.  Accommodating a wheelbase of up to 47”, tires up to 3” and bikes up to 40 lbs. each, this rack will more than meet the needs of the gravel or road cyclist. And most e-road bikes will be well within those parameters as well.

This 32 lb. rack installs tool-free, using a hand dial that secures it to the hitch, making installation or removal a simple task—that is, if you decide to ever take it off. If you transport bikes frequently, keeping the Sherpa 2.0 installed is only a minor inconvenience to accessing the trunk. Even with bikes installed, you can fold down the rack down for trunk access.

The included cable lock doesn’t integrate into the rack—it must be stored in the car when not needed—but does lock into the rack, using the same key needed to lock the rack to the hitch. It provides enough reach to wrap around each frame and one wheel from each bike, but we wish it were long enough to secure all the wheels. At the same time, though, this lock is only here for ease of mind during quick pit stops.

The quality of a Kuat rack does not come cheap. Even as the second-tier rack in Kuat’s range, the Sherpa 2.0 will set you back $498. But it is built to last. Treated well, this rack will be your adventure partner for years to come.

$498; kuatracks.com

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